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Ver Suicide the Ripple Effect

Suicide the Ripple Effect is a movie starring Kevin Hines, Marcus Butler, and Christy Frecceri. Survivor and mental wellness advocate Kevin Hines explores the lasting effects of suicide focusing on breaking stigma, advocacy, and...

Genres
Documentary
Director
Kevin Hines, Greg Dicharry
Starring
Pat Hines, Marcus Butler, Christy Frecceri, Kevin Hines

All Systems Operational

Product details

Genres Documentary
Director Kevin Hines, Greg Dicharry
Writer Ryan Moser, Greg Dicharry, Kevin Hines
Stars Pat Hines, Marcus Butler, Christy Frecceri, Kevin Hines
Country USA
Runtime 1 h 33 min
Audio Português  English  Deutsch  Italiano  Español  Français  Gaeilge  Svenska  Nederlands
Subtitles Português  日本語  Čeština  Australia  한국어  Filipino  Tiếng Việt  हिन्दी 
Quality 480p, 720p, 1080p, 2K, 4K
Description Survivor and mental wellness advocate Kevin Hines explores the lasting effects of suicide focusing on breaking stigma, advocacy, and mental wellness.

Top reviews

Monday, 06 Apr 2020 00:13

The Ripple Effect is a well-made documentary that goes into depth about the effects of depression on those who suffer from it. It's an all-encompassing look at the most common forms of mental illness, including mental illness, depression, and bipolar disorder. While the film shows both sides of the spectrum of mental illness, the documentary really focuses on the effects that it has on those who are afflicted. Those who suffer from mental illness, while they may be an incredibly flawed individual, are still human beings, with feelings and human emotions. It shows us that some individuals are able to live their lives with depression, and some, through drugs and alcohol, are able to ignore their own depression, or, in the case of some, actually become worse. Although I'm sure there are some people who have no regard for others or have been made into a very negative person by mental illness, I feel like there's something wrong with them, and not their mental illness. I understand that mental illness can be incredibly difficult to live with, but it is a difficult illness, and it does have a profound impact on a person's life. The Ripple Effect tells us about this impact, and it's really fascinating to see what it's like to live with mental illness. The Ripple Effect is a really interesting film, that really shows us the effects that mental illness has on a person's life. The Ripple Effect is definitely a great film, but I also feel that it doesn't show the full picture of mental illness. It doesn't show the extreme and the extreme effects that it can have on a person, which is what it's trying to do. It shows the effects that it has on one's life, but it doesn't show the full picture of mental illness, and I felt that that was a little bit of a letdown for me. I definitely think that this film is extremely important, but it's a little too long, and it didn't do a good job at showcasing how great the effects of mental illness are. I recommend this film, but it's definitely not a film that you should see over and over again, because it's definitely a documentary, and that's what it's meant to be. I think that this film is a really good documentary, but it does have some flaws, and it does lack in showing the full effect that mental illness has on a person's life.
Saturday, 04 Apr 2020 18:03

This is a wonderful documentary that's never boring, never too long, never too long. I really enjoyed this documentary and so did the entire audience. It has an amazing mix of clips and real stories. It was inspiring to see what the Baha'i community is doing in the name of Baha'i living and giving, even in the face of persecution. The Baha'i faith is one of the most important religions of the world and is very present in Iran, the country with the highest rates of depression in the world. One of the greatest changes in Iran's social fabric in recent years is the way that Baha'is are getting recognized for their work in the Baha'i community. The Baha'i community has a great influence in developing children's health and literacy, as well as helping them to recognize the great potential in them. I have a particular interest in the Baha'i faith, and I have been living with the Baha'i community in the US for almost 15 years. The Baha'i faith has helped me to work on my own mental health, to make changes in my own life, and to be a better person overall. I was so impressed with the power of the Baha'i faith, and the very open and honest approach that the Baha'i community has to how they treat their followers. One of the things I enjoyed most was the idea of the ripple effect. Every person who participates in the community has a ripple effect on the whole community. The Baha'i faith has made many efforts to do this. The ripple effect is not just in the Baha'i community, but in society as well. Every person who participates in the Baha'i community has a ripple effect on the whole community. I've been to the Baha'i community a number of times and I've noticed how the people there have different levels of acceptance and understanding. There are different levels of understanding in different Baha'i communities. For example, one level of acceptance in the Baha'i community is when someone says that the Baha'i religion is the only religion that matters. Another level of understanding is when someone says that they are not ashamed of their religion. The Baha'i community has many different levels of acceptance, but one of the most important is the level of understanding that the community has. In this community, it is not that difficult to say that there is no God, but the people will say that they are believers of the Baha'i faith, because they know that their religion matters to them. This is a very powerful film, and I highly recommend it. If you are interested in Baha'i religion and have not yet seen this film, I would strongly recommend that you do so.
Monday, 23 Mar 2020 03:36

Here's the deal: most of the film is about a guy who was homeless and worked as a night shift cook at a local motel, but found himself mentally ill and committed suicide. When he was found dead in his hotel room, a man who is supposedly homeless tried to frame his wife for murder, and in the process, his life was turned upside down. This man's life is a textbook example of the "suicide the ripple effect" type of situation. In his attempt to protect his family and friends, he harmed those around him. If this guy was trying to ruin his family, that's an example of the "life is short" type of situation. If this guy was trying to make a point to his family and friends, that's a prime example of the "life is a journey" type of situation. In the end, there was no clear cut answer, but there was a strong "gray area" in which he was trying to make a point, but this was only a symptom of the underlying depression and mental illness. In my opinion, if you were being followed and had a gun pointed to your head, you would not go to a police station to get help. That is because you would just get more depressed and more suicidal, and the police would not help you. This is because you have a mental illness that would end your life, and this is the result of this illness. What would you do if you were being followed and had a gun pointed to your head? You would most likely kill yourself. But, if you were a normal person with a mental illness, you would try to make a point to someone, not just leave it to the police to deal with it. This is also the point I am trying to make in the film. He was not just suicidal, but he was mentally ill, and he was going to do whatever it took to make his point, not just leave it to the police to deal with it. This is why, at the end, the man who was helping the police and his family, was the only one who could do anything to help his family. That is why this man was able to save himself and his family. The film was a very informative film. It helped to put into context what mental illness is. The film was very well done, but not perfect. It was a very interesting film, but not perfect.


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