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Ver Silicon Cowboys

Silicon Cowboys is a movie starring Rod Canion, Jim Harris, and Bill Murto. Three friends dream up the Compaq portable computer at a Texas diner in 1981, and soon find themselves battling mighty IBM for PC supremacy. Their...

Genres
Documentary, History
Director
Jason Cohen
Starring
Rod Canion, Bill Fargo, Bill Murto, Jim Harris

All Systems Operational

Product details

Genres Documentary, History
Director Jason Cohen
Writer Steven Leckart, Jason Cohen
Stars Rod Canion, Bill Fargo, Bill Murto, Jim Harris
Country USA
Runtime 1 h 17 min
Audio Português  English  Deutsch  Italiano  Español  Français  Gaeilge  Svenska  Nederlands
Subtitles Português  日本語  Čeština  Australia  한국어  Filipino  Tiếng Việt  हिन्दी 
Quality 480p, 720p, 1080p, 2K, 4K
Description Three friends dream up the Compaq portable computer at a Texas diner in 1981, and soon find themselves battling mighty IBM for PC supremacy. Their improbable journey altered the future of computing and shaped the world we now know.

Top reviews

Friday, 12 Jun 2020 19:55

From the history of the computer revolution, I feel like I'm about to be a computer geek for life. Not that I'm a great geek, but the fact that I know more than 99% of the information on how computers work and the most modern computers available now. Every time I see a new computer product, I immediately see "The Learning Machine" or "A.I.". Of course, I've been told that "The Learning Machine" was a Japanese product. I believe that the real Japanese products are pretty cool. But since I've been to Japan, I've always assumed that Japanese products are more advanced than those made by Americans. That's just not the case. On a personal note, I think that this documentary is really good. It's actually pretty informative, and the interviews are actually well done. However, there is one major problem with this documentary. The reason I'm not giving this film a higher rating is because of the bad acting. For example, the director, James Bridle, was wearing a full baseball cap throughout the entire film, even when he was trying to show that he was not a computer geek. The same goes for the other interviews. When you have all these professional computer experts that are actually doing great work, you have to hold back some of the performances to ensure that you don't make it look like you're just another nerd. I can understand this would be difficult with so many experts, but it just doesn't seem right. However, the documentaries "Zimmermann" and "The Learning Machine" both manage to hold back some of the acting, although not all. I do recommend this film.


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